The Censored 11 Cartoons DVD *Rare* *Merrie Melodies* *Looney Tunes* + Bonus

December 29, 2016 - Comment

Note to Ebay: The content on this DVD is public domain. This listing does not violate any copyrights. The Censored 11 are eleven Merrie Melodies cartoons by Warner Brothers that were considered offensive, politically incorrect, and contained racial stereotypes. These cartoons have been omitted from the Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD set. There are also

Note to Ebay: The content on this DVD is public domain. This listing does not violate any copyrights. The Censored 11 are eleven Merrie Melodies cartoons by Warner Brothers that were considered offensive, politically incorrect, and contained racial stereotypes. These cartoons have been omitted from the Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD set. There are also 3 bonus cartoons included on the DVD. (1) “Hittin’ the Trail for Hallelujah Land” (Harman and Ising; 1931)An early Merrie Melodie featuring Piggy as a river boat captain whose boat is the stage for a band of black musicians and dancers. Piggy’s girlfriend is assisted by reliable servant, Uncle Tom. (2) “Sunday Go to Meetin’ Time” (Freleng; 1936)A man’s wife drags him away from his dice game to church, but he is soon stealing chickens. A hit on the head by a farmyard fence helps him to see the error of his ways. (3) “Clean Pastures” (Freleng; 1937)Caricatures of popular black musical stars of the day (Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, and Jimmie Lunceford) are seen as angels in heaven, where they “liven things up” by playing “Swing For Sale”. (4) “Uncle Tom’s Bungalow” (Avery; 1937)An early Tex Avery parody of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. (5) “Jungle Jitters” (Freleng; 1938)A dopey traveling salesman knocks on the door of the hut belonging to a group of cannibals who would love to have him for dinner. (6) “The Isle Of Pingo Pongo” (Avery; 1938)Tex Avery’s (and Warner Brothers’) first travelogue parody. An ocean liner leaves port in New York for Pingo Pongo (“the pearl of the oyster islands”). Several Zulu native caricatures. (7) “All This and Rabbit Stew” (Avery; 1941)Bugs Bunny is being hunted by a hunter with a weakness for gambling. (8) “Coal Black and De Sebben Dwarfs” (Clampett; 1943)Bob Clampett’s jazzy parody of Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” with a cast of African-American characters. (9) “Tin Pan Alley Cats” (Clampett; 1943)A Fats Waller cat goes into the Kit Kat Club for some wine, women, and song, and is blasted out of this world by a wild trumpet solo. Fats lands in a Technicolor version of Porky Pig’s Wackyland. (10) “Angel Puss” (Jones; 1944)A boy is paid to drown a cat, but the cat has other plans and, as a “ghost”, heckles the boy. (11) “Goldilocks and the Jivin’ Bears” (Freleng; 1944)Freleng’s version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears with an African-American cast. The Three Bears are now jazz musicians. Bonus Cartoons “Africa Squeaks” (Clampett; 1940)Porky Pig goes on a safari in Africa, and runs into an assortment of crazy animals, wacky natives and Kay Kyser giving dance lessons in the middle of the jungle. This cartoon spoofs the movie Stanley and Livingstone (1939). The title parodies the 1930 documentary Africa Speaks! “Confederate Honey” (Freleng; 1940)Elmer Fudd as Nett Cutler romances Crimson O’Hairoil in this parody of Gone With the Wind (1939). “Which Is Witch” (Freleng; 1949)Dr. I.C. Spots, an African witch doctor, prepares a potion which needs as one of its ingredients, a rabbit. Too bad Bugs Bunny is the only available rabbit. Note to buyers: The content on this DVD will be racially offensive to some people. This DVD does not reflect the opinions of the seller whatsoever. This is simply a piece of American cartoon history.

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